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MonaVie’s Commitment to Scientific Research:

MonaVie’s Commitment to Scientific Research:

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MonaVie has supported more than 60 independent research studies in academic, laboratory, and clinical settings around the world, proving the value of MonaVie products. In addition, MonaVie performs hundreds of analytical and quality control tests every year to ensure the highest levels of purity and potency of every Monavie product.

Partner Institutions

  • Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Boston
  • Brunswick Laboratories
  • College of the Southern Border, Chiapas, Tapachula, Mexico.
  • Federal University of Ouro Preto (Brazil)
  • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Laboratory of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Medicinal Plants, Department of Pharmacology and Psychobiology)
  • Lange Research Group
  • National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health (Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology)
  • NIS Labs
  • Rio de Janeiro State University (Department of Pharmacology)
  • Shanghai Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry
  • State University of Rio de janeiro (Department of Pharmacology and Psychobiology)
  • SupplementWatch
  • Texas A&M University
  • Tufts University  (Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging)
  • University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences
  • University of Southern California
  • USDA Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center
  • USDA, Agricultural Research Center, Eastern Region
  • XEL Pharmaceuticals
Peer-Reviewed Scientific Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Publications:

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2012

Shukitt-Hale, B. Cary, A. N., Miller, M.G., Poulose, S. M. Acai Fruit Improves Motor and Cognitive Function in Aged Rats. Presented to the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, 2012.

Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and neuronal function when fed to rats from 19-21 months of age. These effects may be the result of increasing antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory levels, or by direct effects on signaling and autophagy, in the brain. Açai is a black-purple fruit (genus Euterpe) cultivated in the Amazon delta and in Brazil (Euterpe oleracea Mart. -EO), as well as southern Central America and Columbia (Euterpe precatoria Mart. - EP), and it is known to be rich in polyphenolics that may affect cell-to-cell signaling, receptor sensitivity, inflammatory enzyme activity or gene regulation. Thus, the present studies were carried out to determine if EO or EP, fed in the rat diet at 2% for 8 weeks, would be efficacious in reversing the deleterious effects of aging on motor and cognitive behavior in 19 mo Fischer 344 rats. Results for the motor testing showed that the EO diet improved performance on wire suspension, while the EP rats turned more on the planks, leading to improved balance performance. Additionally, the EO diet improved reference and working memory in the Morris water maze compared to control, but not the EP, diet. 

  • Aging Research Center at Tufts University

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Research/Acai-reverses-age-related-cognitive-decline-in-rat-study

Igor E and Werner G. Dermal Carotenoid Measurements via Pressure Mediated Reflection Spectroscopy. Journal of Biophotonics. 2012; 5, No. 7: 559-570.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbio.201100122/abstract

Wu X, Schauss AG. Mitigation of Inflammation with Foods. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Apr 15.

  • USDA Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center
  • University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22468569

Liedo P, Carey JR, Ingram DK, Zou S. The interplay among dietary fat, sugar, protein and açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp in modulating lifespan and reproduction in a Tephritid fruit fly. Exp Gerontol. 2012 Jul;47(7):536-9.

  • Department of Entomology, The College of the Southern Border, Chiapas, Tapachula, Mexico.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22580089

Kang J, Thakali KM, Xie C, Kondo M, Tong Y, Ou B, Jensen G, Medina MB, Schauss AG, Wu X. Bioactivities of açai (Euterpe precatoria Mart.) fruit pulp, superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to Euterpe oleracea Mart. Food Chemistry. 2012;133(3):671-677.

USDA Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center
University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences

  • Brunswick Laboratories
  • NIS Labs
  • USDA, Agricultural Research Center, Eastern Region
  • AIBMR Life Science

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814612000817

Poulose SM, Fisher DR, Larson J, Bielinski DF, Rimando AM, Carey AN, Schuass AG, Shukitt-Hale B. Anthocyanin-rich acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) fruit pulp fractions attenuate inflammatory stress signaling in mouse brain BV-2 microglial cells. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Feb 1;60(4):1084-93.

  • Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University
  • Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Boston

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22224493

EB2012 – Brown Seaweed (Fucoxanthin) and Licorice Root (Glabridin) for Glucose Balance and Weight Loss

Click here to view study

Talbott S, Talbott T, Dingler E, and Talbott J. Effects of Brown Seaweed and Licorice on Blood Glucose and Weight Loss in Moderately Overweight Subjects. FASEB J March 29, 2012 26:819.32

  • SupplementWatch

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/26/1_MeetingAbstracts/819.32

EB2012 – MonaVie (M)mun Reduces URTIs and Improves Mood State

Click here to view study.

Talbott S, Talbott J, Vosti M, and Blackhurst D. Acai Juice with Baker's Yeast Beta-Glucan Reduces URTI Symptoms and Improves Mood State in Stressed Subjects. FASEB J March 29, 2012 26:lb445

  • SupplementWatch

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/26/1_MeetingAbstracts/lb445

Talbott S, Lange A, Eickhoff J, and Blackhurst D. Effects of MonaVie RVL Weight Loss Program on Body Composition and Blood Lipids. FASEB J March 29, 2012 26:lb310

  • Lange Research Group

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/26/1_MeetingAbstracts/lb310

  • Talbott S, Quan D, Xiong W. Improvement in Skin Carotenoid Levels Assessed by Reflectance Spectroscopy. The FASEB Journal. 2012; 26: lb 283.

Click here to view study

  • XEL Pharmaceuticals

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/26/1_MeetingAbstracts/lb283

Laslo M, Sun X, Hsiao CT, Wu WW, Shen RF, Zou S. A botanical containing açai pulp promotes healthy aging and reduces oxidative damage in sod1 knockdown flies. Age. 2012 May 26.

  • Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology, National Institute on Aging

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22639178

Xie C, Kang J, Li Z, Schauss AG, Badger TM, Nagarajan S, Wu T, Wu X. The açaí flavonoid velutin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent: blockade of LPS-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production through inhibiting NF-κB activation and MAPK pathway. J Nutr Biochem. 2012 Sep;23(9):1184-91.

  • USDA Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center
  • University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22137267

 

2011

EMV Healthy Alternative

With the growing popularity of energy drinks (the current U.S. market stands as a multi-billion-dollar industry), the safety and efficacy of these drinks has been called into question. A recent study conducted at the University of Southern California tested MonaVie EMV and concluded that EMV is a health alternative to many of the energy drinks on the market.

The double blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study was conducted at the University of Southern California. Over a period of two days, 25 participants (14 males, 11 females), whose average age was 20 years old, consumed MonaVie EMV and a placebo, and underwent a number of tests and evaluations. Each day, participants drank one sample (A – EMV) or another (B – placebo) at random one hour before reporting to the laboratory for testing. Upon arrival, subjects were shown eight random words and told to memorize as many as they could. Then a heart rate (HR) recording strap was attached to their chest while they walked on a treadmill, and HR was continuously recorded. For the first two minutes, the treadmill's speed was three miles per hour (mph) and 0% grade. At the third minute, the grade was increased to 10%. Once the data was collected, EMV showed a higher score for Rating of Perceived Exertion, Reaction Time/Movement Time tests, as well as Profile of Mood State (POMS), which evaluates vigor.

Researchers at USC concluded that with some of the safety concerns about current energy drinks on the market, especially given the large concentrations of caffeine involved, MonaVie EMV may offer a safer and healthier alternative.

Girandola, R. Testing the Efficacy of a New Energy Drink. Monavie EMV pilot energy study. Proceedings of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), June 2011. Abstract in: Med Sci Sports Exerc. Vol 43; 5 Supplement.

  • University of Southern California

Jensen GS, Ager DM, Redman KA, Mitzner MA, Benson KF, Schuass AG. Pain Reduction and Improvement in Range of Motion After Daily Consumption of an Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) Pulp-Fortified Polyphenolic-Rich Fruit and Berry Juice Blend. Journal of Medicinal Food. 2011 Apr 6.

  • NIS Labs

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21470042

Acai juice attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE deficient mice through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities

A recent study, published in Atherosclerosis, conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture demonstrated an açai-juice-based diet to have significant cardio-protective properties in an animal model. The experimental diet exhibited cardio-protective effects by reducing free radical cell membrane damage (lipid peroxidation), by boosting antioxidant enzymes, and inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

Açai has received significant prominence due to its high antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory potential. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables is believed to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, largely due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test common wisdom, the cardio-protective effects of a açaí juice mixture were studied in mice.

The animals' dietary intake was controlled by delivering the açai fruit juice blend in a pellet form (5% açai juice powder made from MonaVie† juice). In the first experiment, the mice were fed an American Institute of Nutrition diet (control) or the açai pellet and water for 20 weeks. Both diets were held consistent for protein, essential amino acids, calories, vitamins, and minerals. Food intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and an analysis was performed at day 171 to measure body fat and lean body mass. Postmortem serum, tissue, and plasma were collected and analyzed.

In the second experiment, mice were fed the same diet as the previous experiment for 5 weeks. Food intake and body weight were recorded weekly. At the end, resident macrophages (white blood cells) were collected and used to measure the protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α.

Mean atherosclerotic lesion areas in the aorta for mice fed the açai pellets were 58% fewer (P<0.001) compared to the mice on the control diet. HDL cholesterol was higher in the açai-pellet-fed mice. 8-isoprostaglandin F2α, regarded as the “gold standard” biomarker for assessing lipid peroxidation, was found to be significantly lower in the liver of mice fed the açai pellets (P<0.01).

Two antioxidant enzyme genes Gsr (glutathione reductase) and Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase) were significantly upregulated in the aorta of açai-pellet-fed mice. The activities of Gsr in serum and liver and Gpx in serum were also increased. These two enzymes may act synergistically to reduce lipid peroxidation.

PON1, another serum antioxidant enzyme, was also elevated in açai-pellet-fed mice. PON1 is associated with HDL and has been implicated in the prevention of LDL peroxidation, playing a major role in protecting against oxidative stress and subsequent cardiovascular disease development.

The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, both predictive of current as well as future cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality, were significantly lower in serum and protein levels in macrophages of mice fed the açai pellets. Not only did the açai pellets reduce base levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, it also increased the resistance of secretion of these two cytokines by macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli.

Thus, in an animal (apoE -/- mice) model, an açai-juice-based diet demonstrated cardio-protective effects by reducing lipid peroxidation, by boosting antioxidant enzymes, and inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

Xie C, Kang J, Burris R, Ferguson ME, Schauss AG, Nagarajan S, Wu X. Acai juice attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE deficient mice through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Atherosclerosis. 2011 Feb 24.

  • USDA Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center
  • University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21411096

de Moura RS, Pires KM, Ferreira TS, Lopes AA, Nesi RT, Resende AC, Sousa PJ, da Silva AJ, Porto LC, Valenca SS. Addition of açaí to cigarettes has a protective effect against emphysema in mice. Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2011; 49:855-63.

  • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Laboratory of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Medicinal Plants, Department of Pharmacology and Psychobiology)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=21147193

Kang J, Xie C, Nagarajan S, Schauss AG, Wu T, Wu X. Flavonoids from açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp and their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Food Chemistry. 2011;128(1):152-157.

  • USDA – Arkansas Children Nutrition Center

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=266209

Jensen GS, Ager DM, Redman KA, Mitzner MA, Benson KF, Schuass AG. Pain Reduction and Improvement in Range of Motion After Daily Consuption of an Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) Pulp-Fortified Polyphenolic-Rich Fruit and Berry Juice Blend. Journal of Medicinal Food. 2011 Apr 6.

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/jmf.2010.0150

2010

A recent study confirms the safety of MonaVie Active juice

The safety of MonaVie Active was evaluated in a study that was carried out over several years and recently published online ahead of print by the journal Toxicology.   The results of seven different studies or tests demonstrated the non-toxic nature of MonaVie Active Juice.  Two of the tests confirmed that the juice did not cause damaging mutations or changes.  One test specifically demonstrated that the juice did not damage chromosomes.   The other tests found that the juice did not damage cells or the genetic material in cells.  No adverse affects were seen in an animal model that consumed large amounts of the juice.  The vitamin K levels of the juice were found to be comparable to those found in iceberg lettuce, 21.7 µg/100g.  Knowledge of this level of vitamin K should help in the management of blood thinning medications while consuming MonaVie juice.  This study provides further validation of the safety of MonaVie Active juice.

Schauss AG, Clewell A, Balogh L, Szakonyi IP, Financsek I, Horvath J, Thuroczy J, Beres E, Vertesi A, Hirka G. Safety evaluation of an açai-fortified fruit and berry functional juice beverage (Monavie Active®). Toxicology. 2010. Nov 28;278(1):46-54.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20452390

de Oliveira PR, da Costa CA, de Bem GF, Marins de Cavalho LC, de Sousa MA, de Lemos Neto M, da Cunha Sousa PJ, de Moura RS, Resende AC. Effects of an extract obtained from fruits of Euterpe oleracea Mart. in the components of metabolic syndrome induced in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology. 2010; 56: 619-626.

  • Rio de Janeiro State University (Department of Pharmacology)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=20838232

A combination of anti-oxidant assays helps determine the effectiveness of anti-oxidants found in açai

There are many different tests or assays used to determine the anti-oxidant abilities of a substance.  The oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) is a widely used chemical based assay.  While a chemical based assay, such as the ORAC, shows the chemical ability of a substance to inhibit a free radical, it does not provide evidence that the substance can enter cells and provide anti-oxidant protection to cells.   The combination of chemical based assays and cell based assays provides insight into the effectiveness of anti-oxidants within living cells.  A chemical based assay and two cell based assays were used to test the anti-oxidant activity of seven compounds isolated from açai acquired from Earth Fruits LLC (the acai used in MonaVie products).   Of the seven compounds tested, three demonstrated the ability to enter live cells.  All three compounds had relatively high ORAC and some anti-inflammatory effect.

Kang J, Li Z, Wu T, Jensen GS, Schauss AG, Wu X. Anti-oxidant capacities of flavonoid compounds isolated from açai pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.). Food Chem. 2010;122:610-617.
USDA Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center
University of Arkansas College for Medical Sciences
Shanghai Institute of Pharmaceutical Industry

  • NIS Labs
  • AIBMR Life Science

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814610002803

de Souza MO, Silva M, Silva ME, Oliveira Rde P, Pedrosa ML. Diet supplementation with açai pulp improves biomarkers of oxidative stress and the serum lipid profile. Nutrition. 2010; 26:804-10.

  • Federal University of Ouro Preto (Brazil)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=20022468

Schauss AG, Jensen GS, Wu X.  Acai (Euterpe oleracea): An Amazonian palm fruit with broad antioxidant activity. Evidence of antioxidant availability and anti-inflammatory activity based on a series of bioassays and clinical pilot studies to test a complex natural fruit product. In: Flavor and Health Benefits of Small Fruit. Qian M, Rimando A [eds.] American Chemical Society (ACS) Symposium Series: Oxford University Press, 2010. Chapter 13, pp 213-223.  

  • AIBMR Life Sciences
  • NIS labs
  • USDA Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2010-1035.ch013

Sun X, Seeberger J, Albericol T, Schauss AG, Zou S. Açai palm fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp improves survival of flies on a high fat diet. Exp Gerontol. 2010;45:243-251.

  • National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health (Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20080168

2009

Increased Antioxidant Capacity and Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation in Healthy Adults Consuming an Acai (Euterpe oleracea) Fruit Based Juice.

Free radicals are highly reactive molecules that are associated with the degenerative aging process. Free radicals steal electrons from healthy cells causing cellular damage. They are byproducts of normal metabolic processes in the body and are produced by exposure to environmental pollutants including cigarette smoke, smog, harmful chemicals, toxins, and sunlight. Antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables help counter the effects of the damaging free radicals.

A study conducted by an independent laboratory in the United States commissioned by the Natural and Medicinal Products Research division of AIBMR Life Sciences was performed to determine whether drinking MonaVie Active affects antioxidant activity and or levels in human serum. The study began with a pilot study that determined which assays and follow-up schedule to use.

The main study used two measures of antioxidant activity: 1) the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay, a well-established method for screening and monitoring of lipid peroxidation; and, 2) the Reactive Oxygen Stress in Red Blood Cells (ROS RBC) assay that measures the ability of antioxidants to enter into a living cell and protect it from damage.

Methods. We employed a crossover study with twelve participants, all of whom took both MonaVie Active and a placebo at two separate stages in the study. All participants were told they were consuming MonaVie Active. Each treatment was separated by a seven-day washout period where the participants did not consume MonaVie Active. The placebo consisted of two capsules of potato flakes dyed purple to look like MonaVie Active. Blood samples were drawn from the subjects prior to consuming MonaVie Active and placebo, and at one and two hours following consumption, to determine baseline antioxidant levels. Subjects were randomized to receive either 4 ounces of MonaVie Active or placebo first. Results were compared and contrasted on an individual basis and on a group basis.

Results. The TBARS measure of lipid peroxidation shows more antioxidant activity when the subjects were consuming MonaVie than when consuming the placebo. An inspection of individual subjects revealed that 83.3% of subjects had a decrease (relative to the placebo) in lipid peroxidation after taking MonaVie. A treatment by repeated measures analysis of variance showed this positive effect to be statistically significant at (p = 0.04).

Likewise, the ROS RBC cell-based assay revealed that when subjects consumed MonaVie Active they had a rise in antioxidant activity at both one and two hours after consumption. An inspection of individual results revealed that 82% of subjects had a small to moderate increase (relative to placebo) in antioxidant activity within cells. A treatment by repeated measures analysis of variance showed this effect to be statistically significant (p = 0.03).

In summary, MonaVie Active has not only shown experimentally to increase antioxidant activity in human serum, leading to a decrease in lipid peroxidation in the blood stream, but there is also evidence that MonaVie Active provided antioxidants that are able to penetrate cells. This study confirms that by drinking four ounces of MonaVie Active containing Brazilian acai berry, the subjects had a significant increase in their antioxidant capacity and inhibition in lipid peroxidation, which reduces the risk of cholesterol being oxidized. Oxidized cholesterol has been shown to contribute to damage to the internal lining of the arteries.

Complete and final results of this study are expected to be published in scientific literature in 2008 after presentation of the findings at an international scientific nutritional symposium in the fall of 2007.


Schauss AG, Wu X, Jensen GS. Increased Antioxidant Capacity and Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation in Healthy Adults Consuming an Açai (Euterpe oleracea) Fruit-Based Juice. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables. Ed.: B. Patil. Acta Hort. 841, ISHS 2009.
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/catalog/40670

Schauss AG. A macro and nutrient rich palm fruit from the Amazon rain forest with demonstrated bioactivities in vitro and in vivo. In: Watson RR, Preedy VR, eds. Bioactive Foods in Promoting Health. Oxford: Academic Press; 2009; p. 479–490.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123746283000323

Schauss A, Wu X, Jensen GS, Honzel D. Acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart): systematic and collaborative study of the phy- tochemistry, nutrient composition, and in vitro and in vivo bioactivities of the Amazonian palm fruit Euterpe oleracea Mart (Acai) in humans. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 2009; 15(3): S90–S91.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences

Schauss AG. Açai: An Extraordinary Antioxidant-Rich Palm Fruit from the Amazon. Second Edition. Biosocial Publications: Tacoma, 2009.
http://www.biosocialpublications.com/catalog.htm#acai

2008
Jensen GS, Patterson KM, Barnes J, Certer SG, Wu, W, Scherwitz L, Beaman R, Endres JR, Schauss AG. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity of an antioxidant-rich fruit and berry juice blend. Results of a pilot and randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 2008, 56(18): 8326–8333.

  • NIS Labs

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18717569

Honzel D, Carter SG, Redman KA, Schauss AG, Endres J, and Jensen GS. Comparison of chemical and cell-based antioxidant methods for evaluation of foods and natural products: Generating multifaceted data by parallel testing using erythrocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 2008, 56(18): 8319–8325.

  • NIS Labs

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18717566

Schauss AG. Extraordinary antioxidant activity and nutritional content of a small palm fruit Euterpe oleraceae (“Açai”) from the Amazon. Oral presentation at the 236th American Chemical Society National Meeting, Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Symposium on Flavor and Health Effects of Small Fruits. Philadelphia, PA, August 18, 2008. Cornucopia, Fall, 2008, AGFD 95.

Mertens-Talcott SU, Rios J, Jilma-Stohlawetz P, Pacheco-Palencia LA, Meibohm B, Talcott ST, Derendorf H. Pharmacokinetics of anthocyanins and antioxidant effects after the consumption of anthocyanin-rich açai juice and pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) in human healthy volunteers. Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry. 2008: 56:7796-802.

  • Texas A&M University (Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=18693743

2007
Schauss AG, Jensen G, Wu X, Scherwitz L. Increased antioxidant activity in vivo consuming MonaVie, an Açaí (Euterpe oleracea) berry fruit-based beverage. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Human Health Effects on Fruits and Vegetables, October 9, 2007, Houston, Texas, pp. 39–40.

  • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/catalog/40670

Rocha AP, Carvalho LC, Sousa MA, Madeira SV, Sousa PJ, Tano T, Schini-Kerth VB, Resende AC, Soares de Moura R. Endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of Euterpe oleracea Mart. (açai) extracts in mesenteric vascular bed of the rat. Vascular Pharmacology. 2007; 46: 97-104.

  • State University of Rio de janeiro (Department of Pharmacology and Psychobiology)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=17049314

 

2006
Schauss, A. G., Wu, X., Prior, R. L., Ou, B., Patel, D., Huang, D. and Kababick, J. P.  2006.  Phytochemical and nutrient composition of the amazonian palm berry, Euterpe oleraceae mart. (acai). J Agric Food Chem 54: 8598-603.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17061839

Schauss, A. G., Wu, X., Prior, R. L., Ou, B., Huang, D., Owens, J., Agarwal, A., Jensen, G. S., Hart, A. N. and Shanbrom, E.  2006.  Antioxidant capacity and other bioactivities of the amazonian palm berry, Euterpe oleraceae mart. (açai). J Agric Food Chem 54: 8604-10.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17061840

Schauss AG, Ou B and Wu X. High radical oxygen scavenging (ROS) and antioxidant activity in Euterpe oleracea (OptiAçai) palm fruit pulp. FASEB Journal, 2006; 20(4): A145.

  • AIBMR Life Sciences
  • Brunswick Labs
  • Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center and Agricultural Research Service

http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/gca?sendit=Get+All+Checked+Abstract(s)&SEARCHID=1&FULLTEXT=High+radical+oxygen+scavenging&VOLUME=20&ISSUE=4&FIRSTINDEX=0&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&gca=20%2F4%2FA145-c

Additional Research:

Additional Research:

Expand

In addition to the peer-reviewed scientific publications and presentations at scientific research conferences, and as part of MonaVie’s ongoing commitment to scientific research and quality control, MonaVie conducts hundreds of analytical laboratory assays and has supported dozens of additional scientific studies on Acai, Acai-enriched Juices, and the general health-promoting properties of MonaVie products, including:

  • Acute oral toxicity study of Monavie Active juice with 14-day post-treatment observation period in rats (Limit test).
  • Characterization and isolation of flavonoids in acai pulp including search for novel compounds. (Arkansas Children’s Hospital and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)
  • Analysis of polyphenols and their structural heterogeneity (MALDI-TOF MS at Department of Animal Science and Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison).
  • Mouse peripheral blood micronucleus assay (with pilot study) of Monavie Active juice (DCB Lab).
  • Toxicity analysis of of Monavie Active juice (absence of chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells at TC Lab).
  • In vitro assessment of selected biological activities of Monavie juice for COX-1/COX-2 expression levels, natural killer (NK) cell activation, antioxidant capacity in human cells, and lymphocyte proliferation (NIS Labs).
  • Cytotoxicity assay of Monavie Active (DCB Lab = Taiwan government laboratory).
  • In vitro evaluation of lyophilized MonaVie Active as an inducer of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes (Fa2N-4 cells) (XenoTech Lab).
  • In vivo genotoxicity test of MonaVie Active by bone marrow micronucleus assay in adult mice BALB/c strain (TC Lab).
  • Inhibition test and analysis to detect presence of genetically modified organisms in glucosamine hydrochloride ingredient in Monavie Active for corn/maize, 35S promoter, NOS terminator (Genetic ID Lab).
  • Pilot study of the in vivo effects of consumption of Monavie Active on serum antioxidant levels in humans and their living cells: cytokine profile, inhibition of ABTS-oxidation, and inhibition of MDA-oxidation (NIS Labs)
  • Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of Monavie Active for antioxidant cell protection, antioxidant compounds in cells, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (NIS Labs, US and Canada, and others).
  • In vitro bacterial reverse mutation (AMES) test on Monavie Active (TOXICO, Hungary).
  • The prevention of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic ApoE knockout mice fed different percentages of acai pulp and Monavie juice using control and Western diets. (Arkansas Children’s Hospital and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and USDA-ARS).
  • DNA Array studies to explore possible mechanisms of action of isolated compounds in acai pulp. (Arkansas Children’s Hospital and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences,  USDA-ARS, NIS Labs).
  • In vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test in Chinese hamster V79 cells with Monavie Active juice (TC Lab).
  • In vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test (L5178Y/TK+/- mouse lymphoma assay with Monavie Active juice (TC Lab and AIBMR Life Sciences).
  • In vivo repeat dose 90-day oral gavage toxicity study with Monavie Active in rats with histopathologies (TOXICO).
  • Acute oral toxicity study of Monavie EMV with 14-day post-treatment observation period in rats (Limit Test) (TOXICO).
  • Pilot clinical trial of Monavie Active for changes in pain perception and range of motion (NIS Labs).
  • Pilot clinical trial of Monavie Pulse on cholesterol-lowering effects (NIS Labs).
  • Glycemic index and glycemic load studies of Monavie Active juice (University of Toronto School of Medicine).
  • Characterization and isolation of flavonoids in Monavie juice including novel compounds. (Arkansas Children’s Hospital and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences).
  • Isolation of compounds from acai pulp to elucidate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro based on antioxidant protection assays and ROS formation by polymorphonuclear cells (NIS Labs).
  • Evaluation of cell antioxidant protection of cells of purified (isolate) compounds from acai pulp relative to the ApoE knockout mice atherosclerosis prevention study (NIS Labs).
  • Extended exploration of immune modulating properties of Monavie juice in human cells: Expand on B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation; evaluate effects on dendritic cell maturation; expand on T cell activation (NIS Labs).
  • The effects of acai berry extracts and its components on behavior and neuronal function in aging: Phase 1 (USDA-ARS/Tufts University Center on Aging).
  • Glycemic index testing (Glycemic Index Laboratories) of MonaVie Essential, MonaVie Active, MonaVie Pulse, MonaVie (M)mun, MonaVie EMV, MonaVie EMV Lite, and MonaVie RVL Nutrition Shake Mix.

 

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