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Dec 16, 2010

Attack of the Twitter Hacks and MonaVie

Today you may have heard about a Twitter spam attack that was due to a security breach of the popular media and technology Gawker websites (LifeHacker, Gizmodo, io9, Jezebel, Kotaku and others). Hackers were able to access more than 1 million Gawker user’s email  and password accounts from their servers, and because many users use the same passwords for multiple sites (like Twitter) they were able to access Twitter accounts and start posting spam. The spam sites they are linking to are none other than acai berry diet sites.

While it appears those who are responsible for the attacks are targeting Gawker, the important take away from this spam attack is to change your passwords or make sure you are not using the same logins for online sites as you do for social media sites. So, I would strongly suggest changing your personal social media login names and passwords (go ahead, put it on your "To Do" list)!

The MonaVie Collateral Damage

But for MonaVie, this issue goes even further. The hackers are using spam and are doing so at the expense of the acai berry  because they think of those who market these type of sites are jokes. And why are they a joke? Because these acai sites and those that market them are known for spamming social media sites constantly and buying annoying ads on websites. Look no further than my recent blog post about our social media guide to see a version of this type of spam. Of course the acai diet sites and other companies using the acai berry are not MonaVie, but as the “premier acai blend” MonaVie does not come away unscathed.

Change the Perception

Over the past year we’ve used social media and provided advice on how to communicate effectively and personally using these platforms. Why? Because when we don’t we are no better than the acai sites that spam the social media platforms. So while there’s no way we can control what others not associated with MonaVie can do, MonaVie distributors can decide how they will act online and if they’re going to be a part of the problem or try to CHANGE the perception (notice our most recent blog posts are a great place to start!).

I vote for CHANGE!

Leave a comment if you have ideas or ways to make our online communications more valuable and less spam-like!

[caption id="attachment_1117" align="alignleft" width="0" caption="Michael Jensen, Social Media Promotions Manager"]Michael Jensen, Social Media Promotions Manager[/caption]

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